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Taxes, Medicaid, and children lead reaction among state legislators to new Senate health care bill

Kevin King

Kevin King

Jun 24, 2017

Senate GOP leaders officially released their version of a new health care bill aimed at repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. Within 24 hours, five Republican Senators came out in opposition to the bill including Sen. Cruz (TX), Sen. Paul (KY), Sen. Johnson (WI), Sen. Lee (UT), and Sen. Heller (NV). As questions begin to loom over Capitol Hill as to the likelihood of the Senate passing the GOP's bill, we took a deeper dive into how state legislators and governors are reacting to the new proposal.

State Democrats account for over 85% of statements reacting to the Senate health bill

Since the bill was released, state legislators have issued 493 press releases or statements on social media including 436 from Democrats and 57 from Republicans. Lawmakers in New Hampshire lead the conversation at 36 statements with State Rep. Gerald Ward (D-NH-134) accounting for 14 statements on the new health bill -- making him the most vocal state legislator thus far. Rounding out the top five most vocal state legislatures are California, Arizona, Minnesota, and Iowa.

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Taxes, Medicaid, and children lead the conversation amongst state legislators

The most frequently mentioned issues in statements from state legislators on the new Senate health bill are taxes, Medicaid, and children. Of the 493 statements, taxes are mentioned 130 times, Medicaid is mentioned 89 times, and children are mentioned 82 times.
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10 Democrats, 2 Republicans, and 1 Independent Governor react to Senate health bill

13 Governors from across the country issued a statement in response to the GOP’s new bill. Governor Wolf of Pennsylvania and Governor Brown of Oregon lead the conversation among Democrats with 6 and 4 statements respectively, while Governor Kasich of Ohio and Governor Herbert of Utah weighed in for Republicans.  

Half of Congress wasn't in office for the ACA debate

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